A Look At The History Of The Electric Guitar

Electric Guitars

The Electric guitar hasn’t been around almost as long as the Acoustic and Classical guitars. The Electric guitar was developed just 70 years earlier (the 1930s) by Adolph Rickenbacker. Since that time, the Electric guitar has significantly developed to where it is today. In this post, we’ll review the history of the Electric guitar.

The History

The Electric guitar was very first made in the 1930s by Rickenbacker. Original Electric guitars utilized tungsten pickups.

The very earliest Electric guitars featured smaller sized soundholes in the body. These guitars are known as semi-hollow body Electric guitars and still are somewhat popular today, primarily due to the fact that they are flexible guitars.

However, using pickups, it was possible to create guitars without soundholes (like the Acoustic and Classical guitars have) that still had the ability to be heard, if plugged into amplifiers. These guitars are called strong body Electric guitars.

The Electric guitar’s appeal started to increase throughout the Big Band period of the ’30s and 40s. Due to the volume of the brass sections in jazz orchestras, it was required to have guitars that might be heard above the sections. Electric guitars, with the ability to be plugged into amplifiers, filled this space.

The Electric guitar that is most widespread today is the solid body Electric guitar. Les Paul’s original strong body guitar shape has, of course, altered from the original rectangle-shaped shape to the more rounded shape Les Paul guitars have today.

Throughout the 1950s, Gibson presented Les Paul’s creation to the world. The Gibson Les Paul, as it was and still is called, quickly became a popular Electric guitar. It has actually remained the most popular guitar for 50 years.

Around the same amount of time, another innovator called Leo Fender created a solid body Electric guitar of his own. In the late 1940s, Fender introduced the Fender Broadcaster Electric guitar. The Broadcaster, which was relabelled the Stratocaster, was officially presented to the public in 1954. The Strat, as it is now known, was an extremely different guitar in comparison to the Les Paul. It had a different shape, various hardware, and was substantially lighter. Fender’s Stratocaster Electric guitar is the second most popular guitar worldwide, second to only the Les Paul.

Over the years, other companies, such as Ibanez, Jackson, Paul Reed Smith, ESP, and Yamaha have all produced strong body Electric guitars of their own. The majority of Electric guitars still include the familiar shape of a Les Paul or Strat guitar.

The Electric guitar hasn’t been around almost as long as the Acoustic and Classical guitars. The Electric guitar that is most prevalent today is the solid body Electric guitar. Les Paul’s initial solid body guitar shape has, of course, changed from the original rectangular shape to the more rounded shape Les Paul guitars have today.

The Gibson Les Paul, as it was and still is called, quickly ended up being a really popular Electric guitar. Fender’s Stratocaster Electric guitar is the 2nd most popular guitar in the world, second to just the Les Paul.